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The Magazine of

St. Michael's and St. George's School,

IRINGA,

Tanganyika,

East Africa

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BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Chairman
C. I. W. Hodgson, Esq., O.B.E., M.L.C.

Members

Mrs. D. Mahon.
I. J. McPhillips, Esq.
Fraser Murray, Esq.

Brigadier A. S. P. Murray.
F. J. Mustill, Esq., O.B.E.
B. F. Sarantis, Esq.

STAFF

Headmaster
C. R. W. Francis, B.SC., M A , Scholar of New College, Oxford.

Chaplains
The Reverend S. R. Beesley, B.A. (Bristol)
The Reverend Viotto (Tosamaganga R.C. Mission, Visiting).

Assistant Masters

P. R. Booth, n.A. (Cantab.)
F. V. Brooker, A.P.T.C. D. I. Brooks, M.A. (Oxon.)
R. W. Charles, B.Mu5. (Wales)
G. A. M. Clube, a.A. (Oxon)
      A.R.C.O., F.T.C.L.
G. B. Hall, B.A. (Oxon)
M. L. W. Halls, Dip. Handicraft
      C. and G
B. Hargraves, M.A. (Edin.)
M. de L. Hart, M.A. (Oxon.)

D. R. Henderson, M.A. (St. Andrews)
W. I. Hickman, A.R.C.M.
J. E. C. Hinchliffe, M.A. (Oxon.)
J. A. Johnson, A.R.C.A. (Lond.)
D. F. Lake, Dip. Handicraft.
J. W. Moss, a.sc., (Durham)
C. C. Norman, n.A. (Oxon.)
J. T. Oram, LL.n., M.A. (Cantab.)
R. D. J. Robertson, M.A. (Oxon.)
H. B. Williams, M.A. (Cantab.)
L. J. Wiltshire, F.R.G.S.

Assistant Mistresses

Mrs. S. Booth
Miss S. Carter, LL.B. (London)
Miss L. Dickinson
Mrs. J. Wiltshire

Mrs. C. B. Palmer, M.A. (Cantab.)
Miss J. Stewart
Mrs. L. S. Cunningham, B.A.
      (Queen's Univ.)

Bursar
G. D. M. Palmer, F.C.W.A., A.C.I.S.

Nursing Staff
Sister L. von Gebhart, S.R.N.
Nurse S. L. West, S.R.N.

Headmaster's Secretary
Miss N. K. Jones

Catering Staff
Miss F. M. S. Williams Miss S. A. Liddle Mrs. J. Nicholls

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Matrons
Miss M. M. Farrant,
Mrs. M. C. Henery,
Mrs. Meadon,
Miss S. R. McMaster,
Miss I. L. Palmer,
Miss B. Prichard,
Miss M. Tappenden,
Miss A. White.

Captains of School
B. Springbett, Susan Kerr.

Vice-Captains of School and Prefects of Assembly Hall:
C. Bakewell,
Anna Boddy.

Prefects of Dining Hall
L. Mukabaa,
Anna Bonini.

School Prefects
B Butler,
A. B. C. Chapman,
Jane Kingdon,
Margaret Wiggins.

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USQUE CONABOR


EDITORIAL

The School's first year having drawn to its close, the universal sigh of relief is almost audible. But we can look back on our limited past with some satisfaction.

Foundations laid during the early months of the year have now become firmly established. Some societies appear to have perished quietly by the wayside, some are patronised by the ardent few, but most have achieved a flourishing existence. We now have the opportunity of doing quiet reading and letter writing during club times, and many take advantage of this.

Although the whole year has been momentous, it is natural that the events of this third term should be uppermost in everyone's mind. In particular, we remember the School's first Speech and Sports Day, the Fete and Fete Ball and the first public appearance of the School Orchestra.

We feel that we can light the first candle on our birthday cake and look to the future, not with what was described in the first editorial as the `bliss of inexperience', but with true confidence.

Kay Puttock.

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SCHOOL NOTES AND NEWS

The term commenced on the 2s;th September and ended on the 19th December. The dates for the terms in 1960 are—

Thursday 14th January to Saturday 2nd April

Thursday 28th April to Saturday 23rd July

Monday 26th September to Thursday 15th December

December 19th not only marked the end of the term but also the end of the first year of the School's life. There is every reason to be satisfied with the results; initial difficulties have been overcome and the pattern of school life has emerged very clearly. The academic work has settled down, syllabuses have been worked out and new text books introduced; the religious side of the School is well-cared for; the dignity and beauty of the inter denominational services have been enhanced by the provision, through generous individual donations, of kneelers, cassocks and surplices for the choir, a Quiet Room has been consecrated for private prayer and meditation; many clubs flourish; School music has made great strides; a School Orchestra has been started and it has given its first performance; the first School Play was produced last term and gave two successful performances in Dar es Salaam just before Christmas; this magazine has been published regularly from the first term onwards; games hockey, netball, tennis and athletics for the girls and rugger, hockey, cricket and athletics for the boys are well established but much remains to be done on the playing fields, particularly in the way of grassing; the House and School prefectorial system is growing; the School Prefects now have their own Common Room and gowns, supplied from private subscriptions.

The outlook is promising but there is no room for complacency and the next year is eagerly awaited by both pupils and Staff for the opportunities which it will offer for further progress.

The Headmaster and Mrs. Francis and several members Of the Staff attended a tea-party on Saturday 26th September at the vicarage at St. George's Church, Iringa, to welcome the new vicar, the Right Reverend C. A. Chambers.

Bishop Chambers was formerly the Diocesan for Central Tanganyika for 20 years. He preached at Evensong on All Saints Day and afterwards addressed the Christian Union on the life of a missionary in Tanganyika in the early days. His Lordship has already endeared himself to all by his charm and sincerity.

A School bookshop has been opened this term. The stock includes the better type of fiction and non-fiction. The sales have been most encouraging.

Mr. J. R. Carbonell, the acting Deputy Director of Education, visited the School from 29th to 31st October.

Half Term was from Saturday 7th November to Monday 9th November.

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A School Fete was held on the 7th November and a Fete Ball on the 6th November. The proceeds of the Ball, Fete and private subscriptions amounted to £575 and will be given to the School Building Fund. We are very grateful to the parents and friends of the School who gave us such generous support.

The Fete was opened by Lady Chesham M.L.C., and one of the big attractions was the Police Band which played. under the direction of V. F. Webster, Esq., A.R.C.M., by kind permission of C. S. Wilson, Esq., Commissioner of Police.

The Dance Section of the band also played at the Fete Ball.

Congratulations to Mr. C. B. Hall (Teaching Staff) on his engagement to Miss Patricia Morris of Basingstoke, England.

We have been pleased to welcome as a visitor, Miss Bertha Seifert a music teacher from Kingswood School, Cranbrook, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, U.S.A. Miss Seifert gave a pianoforte recital to a large and enthusiastic audience of pupils and Staff on Saturday 31st October.

The Right Reverend A. Beltramino, Bishop of Iringa, held a Confirmation Service for Roman Catholic pupils at the School on Saturday 14th November; 12 pupils, who had been prepared by the Reverend Father Viotto, were presented for confirmation.

The Right Reverend A. Stanway, Bishop of Central Tanganyika, held a Church of England Service of Confirmation on Friday 11th December. Five pupils were confirmed. 1 immediately following this service, the Bishop consecrated a Quiet Room for use by pupils and Staff for meditation and prayer.

We are grateful for the following Careers lectures~

October 23rd, Mr. Nuttall, Principal of Fast African Railways and Harbours Training School, Nairobi, addressed the boys in Forms 4, 5, and 6 on Careers in F.A.R. & H.

November 8th, Superintendent R. T. L. Egan on Police work in the U.K. and Tanganyika. This lecture was illustrated by a film.

November 16th, the Reverend Kevin Engels on the opportunities in Commerce.

November 16th, Dr. Robin Smith on openings in medicine and nursing.

Mr. J. Mitchell-Hedges of the Public Relations Department visited the School on the 17th and 18th November and took a very interesting series of photographs of the School and School life.

We were pleased to welcome Miss V. Young of the East Africa Office on Friday 20th November. Miss Young took away with her a lot of first hand information about the School for the benefit of people in the U.K. who are about to come out to Tanganyika for the first time.

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The Cambridge Higher School Certificate examination started on Wednesday 18th November and ended on Friday 4th December. There were 6 candidates, 5 boys and 1 girl.

46 girls and boys sat the Cambridge Overseas Certificate examination which began on Monday 23rd November and ended on Friday 4th December.

Mr. A. Emms, the Assistant Director of Education (Technical) and Miss M. Fowler, recently Headmistress of Loleza School, where the examiners for Technical Subjects and Domestic Science in the School Certificate examinations.

Congratulations to B. Goby (Henderson House) on passing the Army Apprentices Examination.

Mrs. C. B. Palmer (Teaching Staff) has unfortunately been ill for several weeks during the term. We all missed her very much particularly the girls in her House, but we were pleased to welcome her back again at the end of term.

The fund for the building of an inter-denominational Chapel a Roman Catholic Chapel and a Swimming Pool has not passed the first £1,000 mark. The Headmaster would be very pleased to receive further subscriptions in cash or cheques, or in the form of Banker's Orders.

The Board of Trustees met at the School on the 10th and 11th December under the Chairmanship of C. J. W. Hodgson. Esq., O.B.E., M.L.C.

The first Speech Day was held on Saturday 12th December. The guest of honour was His Excellency the Governor of Tanganyika Sir Richard Turnbull, K.C.M.G., who was accompanied by Lady Turnbull. At the Thanksgiving Service which preceded the speeches the preacher was the Right Reverend A. Stanway, Bishop of Central Tanganyika.

Lady Turnbull gave away the prizes at the Athletics Sports Finals on Saturday 12th December.

A Service of Nine Lessons and Carols was held on Sunday 13th December

The School Play, 'Arms and the Man', was produced at the Little Theatre in Dar es Salaam on the 18th and 19th December.

We are grateful to the Dar Es Salaam Players for their kind permission to use the Little Theatre, and also to the parents and friends who provided accommodation for the pupils and Staff associated with the Play.

Further gifts of "78" records have been received, and we are grateful to the following for their generosity

Mr. and Mrs. P. T. Austin, Mr. A. L. Hargrave, Mr. Charles Tilney (2nd gift).

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CARTER HOUSE

Housemistress Miss S. Carter.
House Captain: Anna Boddy.
House Prefects: Eliana di Zitti,
Annelize van Buuren,
Carole Pinder,
Kay Puttock.

Having reached the end of the third term, we are able to look back on the School's first year with not a little pride in our achievements. The disorganised group of girls that we were at the beginning of the year has been resolved into a very definite unit with noticeable House spirit and well- established traditions. It has been our aim throughout the year to maintain, to the best of our ability, the high standards which we adopted from the start.

In the third term the girls have worked steadily and well and we attained second place in the competition for the Riddoch Work Shield. Several members of the House were awarded prizes on the strength of the Collections and Prize Examinations results and Pamela Roe is to be congratulated on obtaining an Exhibition in the Scholarship Examination.

Athletics training was given primary attention and our efforts were well rewarded when, on Sports Day, we were presented with the Relay Cup and the Standards Trophy and knew the gratification of taking second place for the Athletics Cup. We should like to thank Mrs. Booth very much for her help in promoting our successes on the Sports field.

During the fortnight of the examinations, extra House Prefects on probation were appointed and they carried on the running of the House very efficiently.

Work in the House garden was somewhat desultory because of the unfavourable conditions, which seem to reward even the best of efforts with very disappointing results.

The Prefects were privileged to arrange the Christmas Crib for the Hall and took great pleasure in making the display as effective as possible.

We are very sorry to lose Miss Tappenden, who has done so much for us.

At the end of my year as House Captain, I should like to take this opportunity to wish Carter House the very best of luck in the future and success in all it undertakes.

Anna Boddy.

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HENERY HOUSE

Housemistress:
House Captain:
House Prefects:
Mrs. Henery.
Anna Bonini.
Carole Frances Stewart,
Anna Howell.

The usual excitement and bustle surrounded Henery House as they hopefully looked forward to an eventful third term; two new arrivals, old friends to some of us, were warmly welcomed, namely Valerie Hext and Una Snapes.

Frantic and vigorous digging began in our sadly neglected garden and thanks to the hard work of several girls, it is now beginning to show good results.

Half-term arrived and we all enjoyed the various entertainments arranged for us, including the fete. This was most successful and great fun was had by all, whether helping in the House stalls or going on extravagant buying sprees.

All too soon, half-term ended and prize examinations for forms one to four plunged the House into sudden silence. The fifth form relaxed happily, but soon the time changed with the arrival of the School Certificate Exami nations, which dragged on for two weeks of frantic study.

Sports, now, became the centre of attraction with all the girls trying hard to gain their standards. Under the kind supervision of Miss Stewart, whom we thank very much, some managed to succeed but in the total reckoning of the standards competition we ended up a gallant last. Practice for the finals continued, but although we tried hard we didn't manage to obtain the same standard as the other houses. Better luck next time, Henery!

Besides gardening activities in the House, an amateur acting society sprang up in the junior dormitory, tinder the directorship of Elizabeth "Wakeling, who wrote and produced the two plays which were performed. The first was "Love and Death", a story of olden days--with lords and ]adies — the wicked witch — much sadness — but fortunately there was also the good fairy, who arranged a happy ending. Later on this was followed by a Nativity play. Two happy evenings enjoyed by us all.

A special prize was awarded to the House Captain, and two House prizes for general order and tidiness went to Susan Ashby and Diane Lewis.

As this is my last House report, I would like to voice my thanks to Mrs. Henery, who has given us her strong support ,tnd encoura~ement throughout the year.

It is only, now, left to me to say 'Good Luck' to all of you; especially to those who will be Prefects next term. n banding over my duties to the new House Captain I trust the girls will co-operate as well as they have done during the last year.

Anna Bonini

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PALMER HOUSE

Housemistress:
Prefects:





Matron:
Mrs. Palmer.
Margaret Wiggins,
Jillian Burnett,
Silvia Papini,
Diana Milner,
Anne Hickman. Miss Tappenden.
Anna Howell.

As we arrive at the end of the first school year, we say goodbye to Diana Mimer who has been invaluable as a Prefect and an athletics captain. We wish her every success in the future.

Mrs. Palmer has unfortunately been ill for most of the term and we all missed seeing her around. Miss Dickinson, however, performed most ably her combined duties as Assistant Housemistress and House coach. The Prefeets, especially, thank Miss Dickinson for retaining a happy atmosphere in the House, which enabled them to study for School Certificate with easy minds. We also thank Miss Tappenden who has given extra time to Palmer House in Mrs. Palmer's absence.

Once more we attained a high academic standard and Jillian Burnett was the lirst person to receive a Headmaster's Credit Prize. Well done, Jill!

This term there has been a great deal of competition between the Houses for the Riddoch Work Shield, and Palmer House was overjoyed when it was announced at Prizegiving that we had won it.

At the beginning of the term we welcomed Anne Hickman, who was made a Prefect on Probation shortly after her arrival; this appointment has now been confirmed and both she and Margaret spent much of their time looking after the house during School Certificate.

During Mrs. Palmer's absence the juniors prepared a play to surprise her on her return. This was produced in front of the school at the last musical evening of the term, and we felt very proud of the younger members of the House.

This is my last report, and I should like to thank the House for their support, especially the Prefects, and also Mrs. Palmer for her kindness and patience.

Good luck next year, and be even better under your new House Captain than you were under me!

Susan Kerr

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PRITCHARD HOUSE

Housemistress:
House Captain:
House Prefects:


Miss Pritchard.
Jane Kingdon.
Carola Sorensen,
Jean Mackay,
Carole Shenton,
Isabel Herkes.

The Christmas term has proved to be the most successful for Prichard House this year. We have made more progress on the academic side and on the sports field.

In the classroom Jacky Wallace and Carolyn Lee have done especially wdl. On the sports field we owe our thanks to Mrs. Gunningham who has continuously perservered in passing standards for athletics, even over weekends. We came third in both the Relay Competition and Standards Competition and, thanks to the hard work of many keen members, especially Toulla Symeonides, Jeanette Barallon, Vanessa Hocking and Susan Allanby, who arranged all the teams, we were able to come first in the Athletics Competition.

The gardens have progressed better this term, with the co-operation of the rains, and are becoming definitely more colourful.

After the hectic day of the Fete, Prichard House spent a comparatively quiet half-term, but Miss Prichard and Mrs. Gunningham very courageously walked all the Juniors into town to do their Christmas shopping.

We would like to thank Mr. Beesley for coming to take prayers for the House twice this term.

Miss Seifert has visited the House twice to talk to the Juniors and we are very grateful to her.

After the rush of Speech Day, a concert was put on by the Juniors for the benefit of the House, with a variety of talent in ballet, singing and a short play produced by Linde Baker.

We are sorry to say good-bye to two of the prefects, Carola Sorensen and Carole Shenton, also Ililary Barber and Loraine Wicht, who is leaving for South Africa, but our best wishes go with them.

Lastly I should like to thank Prichard House for all their co-operation with me during this, our first year, and the high House spirit they have shown. I regret having to say good-bye to you all and wish you the very best in the future.

Jane Kingdon.

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HENDERSON HOUSE

Housemaster:
Assistant Housemaster:
Matron:
Head of House:
School Prefect:
House Prefects:
D. R. Henderson, Esq.
W. Charles, Esq.
Miss J. Palmer.
P. Springbett.
Butler,
J. Gilmour,
S. Wechsler,
S. Riddle,
R. Keller.

At the end of our first year we can look back to a time of continuous development. From the initial stages of uncertainty and novelty we have advanced to a more organised and compact community, to whom the House Spirit now means a great deal. The discipline and tone of the House springs from the top and infiltrates through to the most junior member.

In this respect we would like to think we have made some small contribution

to the atmosphere of the School. Work and Games are both important aspects of School life but the final test of the success of any House must rest on the individual character, his conduct, manner and qualities of courtesy, kindliness, co-operation and humility. Such qualities can be learnt and deve loped during School days and then grow into maturity during later life.

On the academic side, there has been a growing improvement in the attitude to work. Two members of the House sat the University of Cam bridge Higher Certificate. Apart from this, seven subject prizes have been awarded to members of the House and generally a consistently good standard has been achieved. We hope to wrest the Riddoch Shield from Palmer House next year~meantime we send them our congratulations.

The work has been balanced by an equally good performance in games. Cricket, though definitely the sport of a dedicated few (not for publication in England), has proved to be our most successful game this term. Five members of the House played regularly for the School XI and the Senior House team remained unbeaten through the inter-House series, to carry off the honours. In the Cross Country, apart from the good individual performances of Western M., Western D., and Pany, our position was affected by lack of intensive training. In the athletic sports we distinguished ourselves in the field events. Keller and Butler made a close study of the film "Geordie", which was shown earlier in the term, and came first and second respectively in the Hammer. Springbett won the Long Jump and Hop, Step and Jump while Gilmour J., our Captain of Cricket, proved his versatility by winning the Shot. In the track events Riddle and Kuestermann were our most successful contestants while Western M., won a very fine and courageous half-mile, having strained his ankle before the start of the race.

In conclusion we say goodbye to our leavers: . P. Springbett who has provided inspired leadership throughout the year; J. Gilmour and R. Keller who have served the House admirably as House Prefects; lastly to Goby and Delpeche; we wish them every success in their new life. Our thanks go to Miss Palmer for her patience and understanding in medical and domestic affairs.

D.R.H. and B. B.

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HODGSON HOUSE

Housemistress:
House Captain:
House Prefects:
R. D. J. Robertson, Esq.
Matron: Miss J. Palmer.
A. B . C. Chapman.
J. S. Dicks,
R. A. Franklin,
0. Marcandonatos,
Em. Vutirakis,
B. Zakian.

This term we welcomed Henri Marmorat, the brothers Mullin, Rymer, Short and Strong; Zakian became a boarder and was appointed a House Prefect; and our number reached a total of fifty. The fifth and sixth form members with School Certificate in view at once plunged into trial examinations, and emerged with fair success.

On the games front, cross-country running was the order of the day, and after some hard practice the House was rewarded with second place in the final event, in which Marcandonatos, the captain, Viglietti and Strong distinguished themselves.

The Athletics Standards Competition followed, and while standards were piling up, our relay team practised enthusiastically.

The House Relay Competition gave us perhaps the year's most decisive win. We took 9 of the 14 events, and Zakian, Gemell, Cormack and Hallow~ showed excellent form. Our athletics strength was confirmed by further victories in the Standards Competition and in the School Sports. Much of the credit goes to our Captain, Zakian, who set a fine example, from which promising juniors such as Marmorat, Lyon and Blackman are profiting.

It was hardly to be expected that our cricket team should flourish to the same extent, and both our teams suffered resounding defeats, though each was robbed by the weather of a certain victory. Our captain, Mills, Nicholls and Meier did good work against odds, and have laid some found ations for the future.

On a more intellectual level it is only fair to admit that in classwork we have not shone. Here again, however, prospects are improving. Our House Captain, Chapman, has set the example, and Emmanuel and Lefty Vutirakis, Randall, both Mullins, Yazdani and Rymer have all worked admirably. We have been represented in the School Orchestra, and the House has volunteered with a will to join Carter House in a production next term of a potted version of "My Fair Lady"~a most ambitious venture! The early rains have helped our small but devoted band of amateur garde ners, and the House precincts are becoming quite an agreeable view at last.

School and Higher Certificate came with customary suddenness at the end of term, and all our seven candidates are grateful to Mr. & Mrs. Robert son for their encouragement and hospitality during this trying ordeal. We are all, as ever, grateful too to Miss Palmer, our Matron, for looking after us so competently and patiently.

Our best wishes go with our leavers, Philippe Marmorat, Naya, Kobak, Marinakis and Hallowes.

Hodgson House's first year has been sometimes hectic, usually happy and frequently highly successfully. May future years bring the House its fair share of all these ingredients, and confirm its spirited start in the Terri tory's rapidly developing educational scheme.

R. D. J. R.
A. B. C. C.

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ORAM HOUSE

Housemistress:
House Matron:
House Captain:
Prefects:
J. T. Oram, Esq.
Mrs. F. Meaden.
L. A. Mukabaa.
M. Main,
A. Schneemann,
N. Farhoumand,
F. Galliussi.

This brings us not only to the end of the third term but also to the end of the first School year. Although this was a rather busy term for the majority of us, we still kept up the high standard of discipline and spirit in the House, which made it another pleasant term.

Just before half term, the cross-country was run. We gallantly came last, even though we had two very good runners, who secured second and third place. They were V. Poupoulas and F. Galliussi respectively. Cricket was not a compulsory game, but with the few talented cricketers in the House, ue managed to produce a Junior and Senior Team. The Juniors proved to be more successful by winning the cup, under the captaincy of N. Barker, who is a member of the School First Xi. The Senior Team, captained by . Dzuira, tied with Williams House for second place. The relays in Athle tics were held shortly after half term. After an afternoon of tiring events, we secured second place. Much of this credit goes to F. Galliussi, whom we congratulate for his spectacular run of 880 yds. in the Medley. In the Stan dards competition, we also secured second place. However, in the Inter House Competition we came third; much work was done by 0. Afentakis, F. Galliussi, M. Main, V. Poupoulas and A. Schneemann.

Our gardening has continued with increasing interest throughout the year. The rains at the end of this term helped to produce excellent results with the packets of seeds.

Nine fifths formers met with the Collections examinations at the start of term, and at the end of term with School Certificate. The remainder of the House had their examinations shortly after the half-term.

At the end of this term, we will be losing two Prefects, F. Galliussi and A. Schneemann, whom we shall miss a great deal, and, in addition to them, J. Alevizos and 0. Kosmetos. Let me convey to them our warmest wishes and the best of luck in the future.

I hope, after the longed~for Christmas holidays, we will all return at the start of the year with higher determination in the House.

Lastly, 1 would like to wish Matron, Mr. Oram, Prefects and every other member of the House a Prosperous New Year.

L. A. Mukabaa.

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WILLIAMS HOUSE

Housemistress:
Matron:
Prefects:
Lt. Col. H. B. Williams.
Mrs. F. Meaden.
C. Bakewell
J. Howell,
R. Escott,
R. Thompson,
B. Firth,
D. Nelson.

The hobbies rooms and common room this term turned into a hive of industry as those taking School Certificate and the Higher Certificate have used them to the full in preparing for the exams.

Consequently, in other respects, the House has suffered somewhat from the fact that so many of the senior members have not been able to join the daily programme of sport, and assist in the general running of the House. But in spite of all this the House spirit built up by the rugby and hockey teams has not suffered too greatly.

In the early part of the term emphasis was put on cross-country training under the lead of Brian Firth. His labours to build up a good team bore fruit in the race as it was won both individually and as a team by the House.

In the relay meeting just after half-term, our team displayed far greater talent than we expected. We took 3rd place but were only 1 point behind Oram House.

David Nelson captained the House cricket team this term, and although the senior team lost to Oram, we drew with Henderson and won the Hodg son match.

The Junior team lost only I match, drew 3, and won I.

Our congratulations go to P. Barber, C. Carlisle-Kitz and D. Nelson who represented the School.

Our garden this term has flourished into a blaze of colour and life. We owe most of this to Sydney Barallon, who has worked consistently throughout the term to produce a garden of which he has every right to be proud.

At the beginning of the term we started a House Library, the books being bought from House funds. It has proved very popular with all members of the House.

Within the House many have taken an ardent interest in stamp and insect collections. Countless moths and beetles have been collected and preserved by the younger members of the House.

After our efforts in cross-country, enthusiasm in Athletics was not quite so forthcoming. The House did, however, contribute 3 members to the School team which challenged Ifunda and Malangali African Schools. In the House Athletics competition we took 2nd place.

We wish all those leaving us this term every success in their future careers, and look forward ourselves to the coming year and its challenge.

C. J. S. B.

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JUNIOR HOUSE

Housemaster:
Matrons:

House Captain:
J. E. C. Hinchliffe, Esq.
Miss A. White
Miss S. R. McMaster
I. H. Van Rooyen

Numbers are steadily climbing and we have eighty in the House this term, to say nothing of our two very popular honorary members 'Minka' and 'Mouse'.

We should like to congratulate Keith Sands on winning the top scholarship, which he will hold until he leaves the School. The following must also be congratulated on winning Form Pnzes:

Timothy Hannah, Barry Tyler, Ian Fraser, George Rhigas, Lefkios Constantinides and Francois Le Grange, and also Giulio Papini on a Progress Prize. We hope that they will continue to shine.

On the games field we have also made our contribution; in the Sports John Baker won the Junior 80 yards hurdles for Williams House, and Bernhard von Mutius, the Junior High Jump for Hodgson House. Alistair Baxter, Michael & Mervyn Whiteman, Geoffrey Bumpsteed, Angelo Mazzoni Michael Haggerty, Michael Cooper, Barry Tyler, Peter Ley and Bernhard von Mutius have all played with distinction in their House Junior Cricket Teams. The visit of Mr. Springall was a great success and he was much appreciated by all, both for his advice and encouragement.

A number of us have taken part in the activities of the various School Clubs, especially the Christian Union, Natural History, Chess and Stamps, whilst we made up by far the largest section of the Scout Troop, the highlight of whose activities was the week-end camp so ably arranged by Mr. Norman, which was greatly enjoyed.

Our other outside activity has been gardening; a number of us have small plots at the back of the House, where the sound of the crash ofjembe, spade and fork into rather hard, dry earth can be heard most afternoons, to the accompaniment of our squeaky wheel-barrow. We hope that the plots will nearly all be producing something edible by next term.

This term has seen the arrival of new furniture in our Common Room, and each dormitory has had a small cubicle set aside for letter writing, and the playing of ludo and draughts, of which each dormitory now has a set. The House Library has been increased to 180 volumes, and it has been well used.

At the end of the term Hodgson and Oram dormitories worked very hard, under the direction and help of Miss MeMaster, to put on a variety entertainment for us. It was a most enjoyable evening; James Hallowes' writing of 'Young Grandma', and the costumes made from 'nothing' by Bernhard von Mutius, deserve special praise. We hope it will prove to have been the first of many more.

We have a number of keen members of the Choir, some of whom deligh ted us all by their singing of the treble solos in the service of Nine Lessons and Carols at the end of term.

We must thank Miss MeMaster and Miss White for all they have done for us and their kindness during the past year.

Lastly our very best wishes go to last term's leavers, Richard Jarman, Peter Martin and Charles Marzocchi.

"Junior".

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SPEECH DAY DECEMBER 12TH

SPEECH Day is one of the most important days in any school year and surely this one, the first, was especially so. The ceremony was as momentous as the occasion demanded, honoured as the School was by the presence of His Excellency the Governor of Tanganyika, Sir Richard Tumbull, K.C.M.G., and Lady Tumbull.

The proceedings were opened by the Chairman of the Board of Trustees, Mr. C. J. W. Hodg son, with the following speech:-

"Today is a notable milestone in the history of European Education in this Territory marking, as it does, the opening Speech Day and Prize Giving of St. Michael's and St. George's School.

"As Chairman of the Board of Trustees, it is my privilege and pleasure, sir, to extend to you and Lady Tumbull a very warm and sincere welcome to the School and to express our appreciation to you for sparing time to come here for the School's opening official ceremony. One does not need to exercise the inspired guess work of a Daily Mail reporter to realise that your time must be more than fully occupied with the problems and details involved in preparing the next steps to be taken in the orderly constitutional progress of this Territory and we are also aware that you will shortly be busy welcoming the new Colonial Secretary when he visits Tanganyika and of the additional work in which this will involve you. We are therefore deeply grateful to you for coming here today, and 1 am sure that we all feel it is most appropriate that by doing so you will be setting the seal on this great project which your distinguished predecessor, Lord Twining, initi ated when he laid the foundation stone.

"To my Lords Bishop we also extend a sincere and cordial welcome, not only in your own person but also as representatives of the great Missions in which you serve. You have been the pioneers in founding and fostering education in Tanganyika. For this we are deeply grateful to you and I feel it is singularly appropriate that you, Bishop Chambers, should be here today as it is the silver jubilee year of the Arusha School which was the first European School to be built in Tanganyika and of which you, sir, were the founder.

"This is the first European Secondary School to be built in Tanganyika and we particularly welcome your presence at our opening Speech Day.

"To all parents, may of whom have travelled long distances to be here, we also extend a warm welcome. We hope, and indeed feel confident, that you will be pleased at the progress that has been made. I feel that I should perhaps here, whilst welcoming you, sound a note of warning that your Board of Trustees have been examining the financial position of the School and have regretfully come to the conclusion that unless increased grants can be made by Government, it will be necessary next year to make quite a substantial increase in the fees payable. I trust, however, that this announcement will not make any of you feel that our welcome and thanks to you is any the less sincere.

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'~l now turn to you, Mr. Headmaster, the Chaplain and Staff of the School and, on this first official opportunity, most cordially welcome you all to the School. It might be more appropriate perhaps were I to use the Latin word '~Ave" which, if my memory serves me correctly, contains, besides the element of welcome, the meaning of "Hail". The Board and, I am sure, the parents and people of this country would like to thank you for so willingly and cheerfully accepting the challenge which starting up this new school involved and how, under the leadership of your Headmaster, you have become a team which has successfully met the many difficulties and frustrations which are inherent in any enterprise of this nature, and by your enthusiasm and example have achieved in so short a time the signal success which has attended your efforts. Our welcome and our thanks are due to you.

"Finally, I would like to say a word to you, boys and girls. Although I have left you to the end you are the most important element of all for without you there would be no Board of Trustees, no Staff and no School. We therefore extend to you all, and to those who will come after you, a very warm welcome and are pleased to note that term by term your numbers tend to increase.

"When they were appointed, your School Board were charged to run St. Michael's and St. George's School on the lines of an English Public School and it has been our endeavour and that of the Staff we have been so fortunate to recruit, to carry this out. There has been no School like it in Tanganyika and T have every confidence that, with God's help, we shall succeed in building it up to stand favourable comparison with any secondary school in the Commonwealth.

"But this will depend on you youngsters. The training of an English Public School is a training in leadership, that intangible quality which transcends purely academic and sporting success. Leadership in this country will become ever increasingly important and it is on you and succeeding generations that this responsibility will Pall. The qualities of patience, tolerance industriousness, loyalty, self-reliance, a sense of responsibility allied to indomitable determination based on complete integrity will be required and it is to turn out this finished article from the raw material sent here, in the shape of you girls and boys, that we regard as our trust. Might I remind you once more of the words of the Thanksgiving Service which we attended today~"Remember that wherever you go you carry with you the good name of St. Michael's and St. George's School"~that applies to each one of you here not just to those who are leaving. May you all carry that charge worthily and prove yourselves to be real leaders in this great country of Tanganyika which is now emerging into a nation. Our welcome and good wishes go with you.

"Finally, there is one point I should like to emphasize. This being the School's first Speech Day, it is likely to set a precedent but I sincerely hope that in the future, the Chairman of the Board will not be asked to make the address of welcome to our distinguished visitors but, as is the practice in many of the great public schools in the U.K., the Head Scholar or School Captain will take on this duty.

"Your Excellency, My Lords, Ladies and Gentlemen, Girls and Boys once again 1 welcome you and thank you for attending this ceremony.

"I will now call upon the Headmaster to make his report."

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THE HEADMASTER'S REPORT IS ALSO GIVEN IN FULL:—

"Mr Chairman, Your Excellency, my Lord Bishop, ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls, it is my privilege to present the first Headmaster's Report for St. Michael's and St. George's School. It is a big task to equip and staff a boarding school in 8 months and this was only made possible by the active co-operation of many people. The list is too long to mention them all but I would like to express my appreciation of the advice and assistance given by the Director of Education and the Director of Public Works and their staffs. We were unable to place our orders for equipment until late in 1958 and it was due to the Chief Storekeeper, P.W.D., and /many good friends in the offices of the Crown Agents in London that our equipment arrived in time for the opening of the School on the 26th January. The main consignments of such essentials as bedding and cutlery arrived on the 23rd January and the first lot of pupils arrived the following day, that is what I believe is known in racing parlance as a photo finish. I must also pay tribute to you, Mr. Chairman, for your long safari of at least 15,000 miles to give invaluable assistance and advice in the recruitment of Staff. The majority of the Staff from the U.K. arrived by charter plane on the 10th January on what is probably the largest academic air lift in the history of the British Commonwealth. At this stage I would also like to acknowledge, Mr. Chairman, the friendly encouragement which the Board of Trustees has given to the Staff and to my wife and myself through the difficult days of the School's first year. And I must not forget the kindness of the people of Iringa: they gave us a magnificent welcome on our arrival and nothing is too much trouble for any section of the Iringa community if it is for the School: we value our friendly relationship with the Town.

"I would like to refer to the academic work of the School first. It is my firm belief~an old fashioned one perhaps-that School is a place where the pupils should learn to work, and that if the standard of the academic work is good, then the other important School activities such as music, clubs, societies and games will automatically flourish. The accent this year has been very much on work and I am most grateful to the teaching staff for their wholehearted and loyal support, and I am pleased to say that our pupils have responded well. Our first lot of candidates have lust sat the Cambridge Oversea Certificate examinations; we entered 46 boys and girls for the School Certificate and 5 candidates for the Higher School Certificate. It is our policy to enter as many pupils as possible for Certificate examinations but this is done on merit and not on age: if it is the opinion of the teaching staff that a pupil's work is not up to Certificate standard, then that pupil will not be allowed to take the examination and parents will be given prior warning about this as far ahead as possible.

"It is probably an opportune time to say a few /words about our Entrance Examination. It is essentially a qualifying examination, in which a girl or boy must reach a certain academic standard before they can be considered for admission. The entrance standard has gone up this year, but I do not anticipate that it will go much higher in the future. So far we have been able to admit /all children who have reached our entrance standard but I must point out that our accommodation is limited and in the near future will be stretched to its fullest extent.

"Next, discipline and behaviour. We are aiming at the highest standards of discipline and behaviour. /The well disciplined School is a happy one and the best type of discipline is self-discipline and that is why the Housemasters

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and Housemistresses and myself spend a lot of time in fostering and developing the prefeetorial system. I regard education as a combined operation between the Home, the Church of the parent's choice and thc School. And I would now like to speak to parents as a parent myself as well as a schoolmaster, but I must first express my appreciation of the encouragement, co-operation and friendly constructive criticism which I have received from many parents. It seems to me that our main duty as parents is to give our children what they need and this is often very diffe rent from what they themselves want~and what they need most of all is a code of behaviour based on the highest principles. I do submit respectfully but firmly and sincerely that it is neither necessary nor desirable that boys or girls, whilst still at School, shotild be allowed to smoke or drink during the holidays. It makes School discipline for such pupils very difficult during term time. I put this forward as a suggestion for the serious consider ation of parents of teenagers. With regard to religion, I feel very strongly that it is the parents' inalienable right and duty to choose the religion of their children and everything is done here to respect that right. This is a multi-denominational School. The Chaplain conducts Church of England services and, at parents request, prepares pupils for Confirmation. He also arranges for non-conformists ministers to preach here and I am grateful to these ministers who often travel hundreds of miles for this purpose. We have had one visit from a priest of the Greek Orthodox Church in Dar es Salaam to take a service for our Greek pupils, and I hope that such visits will become more frequent in the future. I am also very grateful to the Rt. Rev. A. Beltramino, Bishop of Iringa, for arranging for Father Viotto to visit the School regularly to minister to the Roman Catholic pupils.

"In any residential school it is important to have as many out of School activities as possible in order to teach the pupils how to use their leisure time profitably and with enjoyment. In this respect, games are important. Our playing fields are still rough and require a great deal of development but the girls and boys have played their games enthusiastically and although the standards of the School teams have not been high the results are very promising for the futtire. The great difficulty with games is arranging inter-School fixtures and our matches against local adult teams and House matches are not really a substitute for School games, and this applies to the girls more than the boys. The girls Hockey XI was /restricted to fixtures with the Staff and wives. The Rugger XV lost only one of its four matches and the Hockey Xl had the satisfactory record of won 5, drawn 2, lost 2. For the cricket we were fortunate in having Mr. Springall, the M.C.C. coach, to give a special week's coaching and it is his opinion that we shall have a very good team in 3 or 4 years time. The athletics performances of boys and girls also show great promise. This term we were invited to compete in a triangular fixture against Ifunda Trade School and Malangali Secondary School and our opponents very sportingly restricted the match to the events for which we had been able to make preparation. After a very enjoyable match we won by a narrow margin. The girls have had practically the exclu sive use of the tennis courts this term and I notice that they are now hitting the ball harder and more accurately.. Many Clubs and Societies have been started and provision is made for all tastes. The Christian Union, under the wise and energetic leadership of the Chaplain, has become a popular insti tution and its Sunday evening meetings are attended regularly by upwards of 100 members. The Dramatic Society put on a very successful first produc tion of Shaw's "Arms and the Man" last term and this production is being taken to Dar /es Salaam next week. The Little "Theatre has very kindly

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been placed at our disposal and I hope that the two performances will be well supported. Dramatics is only a part of the artistic side of the School. Art as such is fostercd here both in and out of School, and the Director of Music is to be congratulated on the great interest in music which he has aroused. We have nearly 70 pupils learning the complete range of musical instruments and last Saturday thc School Orchestra, with 12 pieces, gave its first public performance. The Music Society, the Glee Club and the Choir flourish and I do invite as many of you Is pOSSibIL to attend our Service of ~ine Lessons and Carols tomorrow. T"o comp~nics of Guides and one of Scouts have been started. During the I 1st holid tys 4 of the senior boys attended the Outward Bound Course at Loitokitok md we shall encourage more boys to go in future. The Natural H istol y ~nd Geographical Society is very active and its members do a lot of fiLId woi k this term some of them paid a week-end visit to the Mkumi Game Reser\e where practically every type of game was observed. Chess and St imp (l~ bs meet and the members of the Scottish Country Dancing Club are most enthusiastic.

"I think that it /is most important that a school should have its own magazine and I am therefore particularly grateful to Mr. Brooks and his editorial staff of pupils for the production of the'' I mean'' at the end of each of the first two terms. The third edition is about to go to press. I am sure that Parents~particularly those who are unable to \ sit the School~find it interesting and enjoyable.

"A boarding /school depends largely for its smooth running on the ancil lary services. Here, as in other Departments, there were teething troubles but I am pleased to report that they were tackled vigorously and effectively and I should like to pay tribute to the work of the Bursar, the Office Staff, Sister von Gcbhardt and Nurse West, Miss Farrant at the laundry, the dormitory Matrons, Mr. Barker our engineer and Mr. van Blokland the groundsman. I have already referred to the good work of the teaching staff but I must also thank the Housemistresses and Housemasters for the splendid way they have all set about the cicantic task of welding fifty or sixty boys and girls into a House. All the Houses have the right spirit and they are developing a pride in what they do, thereby laying sound foundations for the future. Tt was a happy thought indeed, to name the Houses after the llrst Housemasters and Housemistresses and, in one easc, after the Chair man of the Board

"You probably all know that we need a Chapel for inter-denominational worship, a smaller Roman Catholic Chapel and a Swimming Pool and we have started to raise funds for these projects. This term we held a Fete and a Fete Ball and _575 was raised. I am very grateful to the numerous people who helped to organise the Fete and to others who supported it either by attending or sending subscriptions. I have this week received the sketch-design plans for one of the Chapels and the Swimming Pool~they are most attractive but their implementation will need a lot of money and unless we find diamonds, oil or some other valuable mineral in the School grounds we shall have to appeal to the public for their support. When we have assembled all the facts and figures we shall be launching a Building Fund Appeal /but in the meantime, I should be pleased to receive contri butions from anyone who would like to make a donation now.

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"Tn conclusion, I think I can fairly say that much has been done in this first year but we all realise that much more remains to be done~and we have the Paith that we shall be blessed with the guidance and wisdom to achieve the tasks which lie ahead of us."

The Chairman then called upon His Excellency to distribute the prizes and deliver his keenly awaited speech.

It is difficult to do justice to the Governor's address since much of it was clearly not based on detailed notes and your editors are sadly ignorant of shorthand. Persistent-~perhaps even thick-skinned~requests for a copy were unsuccessful and we must rely upon our memories of it. We at once refute one of His Excellency's points by remembenug much ofit very clearly.

Sir Richard congratulated the Headmaster upon his achievements of the past year, during which so many qualities of personality and character had been called for, and extended his congratulations to all who had contri buted to the success of this first year. He then turned to give the pupils those few words of moral instruction and wisdom which, he drily remarked, he felt were expected of him. He veiled his meaning in bursts of witticism and drew an analogy between school food and politics which left some of his audience a little bewildered perhaps. However, the principle of striving to cure bad things without throwing overboard the whole system was clearly established: it is good to complain about school food, but bad to urge the execution of the cooks on the grounds that they are scheming to poison the community.

His Excellency deplored the u~e of woolly phraseology he defined Culture, for example, simply as a way of doing things~and urged his liste ners to avoid those ~isms'' the meanings of which have been distorted to suit the purpose of the speaker and are the weapon of the unscrupulous.

We were reminded that life i~ full of routine work and monotony which must be squarely faced and accepted~the happy man is he who does this successfully.

Referring to School Societies, the Governor suggested that anyone uncertain of where his interests lay should try Dramatics which offers such a variety of activities, apart from the acting itself.

Mr. J. J. McPhillips moved a vote of thanks to His Excellency; he was seconded by Mrs. D. Mahon who wished us all a merry Christmas- upon which happy note the proceedings closed.


K. C. P. and D. I. B.

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PRIZE LIST 1959

First Form Prizes:
 

1.A
1.B.
1.R.
1.C.
1.D.

K. Sands
T. Hannah
Margaret Rymer
Marietta de Scossa
Jacqueline Wallace

S. Lockley
B. Tyler
1. Fraser
L. Rhigas
L. Constantinides

Second Form Prizes:
 

2.A
2.B.
2.C.
2.D.

Helen Morphopoulos
M. Crawford
Jill Appleby
Dora Tofas

S. Golby
Pamela Rayment
R. M. Belbin
F. Le Grange

Third Form Prizes:
 

3.A
3.B.
3.C.

S. Frearson
Caroline Lee
M. Kelly

Jane Furbank
F. Yazdani
Yvonne Escott

Fourth Form Prizes:
 

English

History
French
Geography
Mathematics
Physics
Chemistry
Biology
Technical Subjects
Domestic Science

Susan Croft
Morag Cormack
Morag Cormack
Vanessa Hocking
Vanessa Hocking
Deirdre Richards
B. di Zitti
C. Thompson
J. Coutouvides
R. Keller
Mary Zambetakis

Fifth Form Prizes:
 

English
History
Geography
French
Mathematics
Chemistry
Physics
Biology
Technical Subjects
Domestic Science

D. Nelson
Sally Morton
Gillian Burnett
D. Webster
Sylvia Papini
N. Farhoumand
D. McLachlan
D. McLachlan
Sally Morton
R. Thompson
Carola Sorensen

Sixth Form Prizes:
 

English
History
Geography
Chemistry
Biology
Physics

Kay Puttock
Butler
Em. Vutirakis
Anna Boddy
A. B. C. Chapman
J. Howell

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Progress Prizes:
 

Nellie Fourie
Anna Howell
Vanessa Maher
Pamela Roe

P. Barber
G. Papini
J. Tantiras

Special Prizes:
 

Headmaster's Prizes


Headmaster's Credit Prizes



Music Prizes



Chapel Reading Prize

Scripture Prize presented by St.
Andrew's Church, Kongwa

Scripture Prizes


Art Prizes



Riddoch work Shield

Susan Kerr
B. Springbett

Anna Boddy
Gillian Burnett
A. B. C. Chapman

Bryony Hawkins (piano)
Vanessa Maher (oboe)
B. Staub (flute)

M. Main


C. Bakewell

Kay Puttock
Carole Pinder

Jane Kingdon
Sylvia Papini
Sheila Markham

Palmer House


CHAPEL NOTES

There have been so many ~first occasions' this t~i m that it is difficult to know which to ~inglc out for especial mention Pc haps the most radical one has been the decision to invite certain visiting p eachers who are not Church of England clergymen to conduct servi~c~ according to the'form of worship that is norma~ to their own denomination Eoi want of a better term these have been called ~Nonconformist Sc vic~s but, naturally, this is a name that has been imported from England md if a better designa tion could have been devised we wotild have avoldLd ~uch ~ misleading term.

The decision to make this innovation was arrived at after a careful sttidy of the denominational amliations of the School.

The Roman Catholic pupils are cared for by their own Priest. Thus most of the School was being ministered to by the Chaplain or by visiting preachers~ all of whom addressed the School within the context of a Church of England service. This seemed neither fair nor desirable, and, as soon as the situation was flilly appreciated, invitations were extended to the visiting preachers of other denominations to conduct one service during their visit in the manner in which they were accustomed to order worship in their own churches. The effect of these services on the School was marked. Children

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and Staff were able to see that, although the form of worship differed, t~e object of the service and the spirit in which it was conducted did not. We were able to understand a little better what St. Paul meant when he said that true believers in the Saviour are "All one in Christ Jesus".

Another "first occasion" was to have stay with us, for nearly a week, a visiting /clergyman who came more especially to contact those connected with the sphere in which he normally works. The Rev. Allan Chappell, the Precentor of St. Albans Collegiate Church, Dar es Salaam, was well known to a considerable number of School members before he arrived, but by the end of his week with us he had become the friend of many more. His friendliness and his transparent sincerity were used of God to cause many to think more deeply concerning spiritual things. We hope that his will be the first of many similar visits.

On the final Saturday of term, the first School Thanksgiving Service was attended by His Excellency the Governor, Sir Richard Tumbull, and by many parents and friends of the School. During the Service those who were leaving School were presented with a Bible as a tangible memento of the Christian heritate into which they were entering and in which the School had striven to ground them. In his sermon, the Bishop of Central Tanganyika, the Rt. Rev. Alfred Stanway, speaking to those leaving, said

in the words of the Prophet Mieah that whether they achieved positions of great importance or only filled the more humble situations in life, God required that they should "do justly, love mercy, and walk humbly with their God". He emphasised that even those who held positions of power and authority were expected by God to act justly, not only towards influen tial groups, but also to the minorities and to the weak. True honesty and fairness would only be obtained as one yielded one's life to Christ, and this yielding had to be a daily humble relationship with Him.

This memorable final weekend of term concluded with the traditional Service of Nine Lessons with Carols on the Sunday evening. The School Hall and Gallery v crc filled, and the congregation entered with spirit and understanding into the Christmas hymns. The augmented Choir under the Director of Music, Mr. R. W. Charles, sang carols new and old. The Lessons were read by representatives of different stages of the School and by members of Sta~ One of the visiting parents, perhaps, summed it up when he said, It was not just a show, as these services so often can be, but it was also a reverent service of worship and praise, as it properly should be."

The School is indebted to the Director of Music and to the Choir for the enormous amount of hard work that they do, entirely in their spare lime, in order to equip themselves for leading the worship. Their singing during the term, finding its culmination in the Carol Service, has given plea- sure to great numbers and has added much to the beauty of the services.

It is impossible to list all that has occurred this term. We are most grateful to the Rev. Mr. Vanderwerwe of the Iringa Mission ofthe Assemblies of God, and the Rev. Carlos Owens of the Mbeya Mission of the Baptist Church of East Africa for conducting our first Non-conformist Services. We have much appreciated, too. the visits of the Rt. Rev. G. A. Chambers, the new Chaplain of St. George's Church, Iringa, and the Rev. K. F. Engel, the Chaplain-in-Charge of the Cathedral of the Holy Spirit, Dodoma.

S. R. B.

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CATHOLIC NOTES

There have been a number of events of note in the course of the term.

On St. Michael's Day an evening Mass was held in the Assembly Hall. There was a full attendance and Father Viotto ave an illuminating sermon on the significance of the day.

On November 14th the Bishop of Iringa, the Right Reverend A. Beltra mino visited the School to confirm a number of boys and girls. The follow ing were confrmed:--Candy Ghaui, Lesley Ephgrave, Roland Keller, Robin Gemmell, Geoffrey Dingwall, Ian Sherred, John Naya, Raymond Norsworthy, Pietro Licalsi, Giulio Papini, Michael Whiteman, Mervyn Whiteman.

After the Confirmation a party was given for the children and their sponsors by Colonel and Mrs. Williams. We were delighted that the Bishop, the Headmaster and the Chaplain were also able to attend the party.

On Speech Day the Bishop was to have visited the School again to celebrate Mass. We were disappointed to learn on the previous day that he would be unable to come. Father Viotto said the Mass and we were pleased to see a number of parents and friends in the congregation including Mr. & Mrs. McPhillips.

We must conclude by thanking Di Zitti, Barallon and Norsworthy for the help they have given at Mass and Benediction and also Shirley Bailey and Helen Constantinides for looking after the arrangement of the altar flowers.

H. B. W.


CHRISTIAN UNION

The Christian Union has had another very successful term. We started with Bible Study conducted very ably by Christopher Bakewell. The Chris tian Union would like to congratulate him on being awarded the St. Andrews Church, Kongwa, prize. After that, we had a series of visiting preachers:

Mr. Chappel, Bishop Chambers, Mr. Engel, Dr. Smith and Mr. Owens. We would like to thank them, and Mr. Beesley, for arranging to come to our meetings and giving us such an enjoyable time.

We had a great many film shows this term from all over the world. We also had a variety evening in which we had singing and games. At the final meeting we had three films, one on models, another on family life in Wales and, finally, one on the Queen's Coronation. The Christian Union would like to thank Mr. Halls very much for the number of times he has operated the projector throughout the year.

M. Wiggins.

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PROVINCIAL SPORTS AT MBEYA

Although this is our first year in Athletics, the Master i/c. Athletics, Mr. F. Brooker, and eight members of the School were chosen to represent the Iringa District at the Provincial Sports meeting which was held at Mbeya.

We would like to congratulate B. Zakian on his performances in the 100 and 220 yards which gained him the "President's Cup" for winning both events and breaking the Territorial record in the 100 yards. J. Gilmour won his event with the shot and M. Main won the discus with R. Thomson third. Mr. Brooker came second in the Pole Vault whilst V. Poupoulas ran a five minute mile which, at the time, was his best performance. A. Schneemann and F. O'Brien obtained second and fourth places respectively in the javelin. F. Gall iussi did not compete for medical reasons, but he was selected, together with Mr. F. Brooker, B. Zakian, M. Main, J. Gilmour, and A. Schneemann, to represent the Southern Highlands Province at the Territorial Sports at Arusha a fortnight later.

The meeting was a great success since the Iringa District team consisted of 700_ of School athletes. We sincerely hope to improve our standards still further during the coming years so that our District team may consist of an even greater majority of School athletes.

A. Schneemann.

ATHLETICS CLUB

For the first time in the School's history, we entered an Athletics team to compete for the triangular Athletics Shield, with striking success. Com peting were Ifunda Trade School and Malangali, and the meeting took place at Ifunda.

Teamwork and individual performances were generally good. The 4 x 440 relay team finished second, while J. Gilmour who put the shot a distance of 37' 6 ½", was an easy winner of his event. R. Escott finished second. B. Zakian won the Hop, Step and Jump with a jump of 39' 8" followed closely by B. Springbett.

M. Main won the Discus, throwing 116', whilst B. Zakian easily won the hundred yards with A. Chapman in second place.

B. Springbett secured second place in the long jump with a jump of 19' 1" and D. Western took second place in the javelin, throwing a distance of 133' 11". C. Bakewell and B. Zakian each came second in their events, the 880 yards and 220 yards respectively.

The climax of the meeting was the presentation of the new shield by Mrs. Francis. The Athletics Captain, A. Schneemann, who unfortunately could not compete owing to a cracked ankle, collected the shield and the meeting was brought to a close.

It is hoped to improve the standard of athletics in our school before the next Provincial Sports, so that we may promote a greater number of competitors titors for the Territorial Sports next year.

B. Springbett,       
Secretary.

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ATHLETICS

The third term started with athletics and cross-country training. The programme was a very full one, consisting of the inter House Cross-Country Championship, the Inter House Athletic Standards Championship for girls and boys, the Inter House Relay Championship for girls and boys and, finally, the Inter House Athletics Championship for girls and boys.

The cross-country run was a great success for Williams House, who were the winners, and for C. Bakewell, the individual winner. Poupoulas was a very close second. Both boys are to be commended for their very good performances.

Cross-country over, everyone concentrated on Athletics training for the next event which was the Relays. This inter House Championship was fought, throughout, tooth and nail. The very fine spirit which these young girls and boys displayed was a real credit to them and to the School. Hodgson son House 4 x 110 team was only 2 sees. outside the Tanganyikan record. Hodgson's hard training and wonderful team spirit made them easy winners of this championship.

The Standards Competition was also very keenly contested. Carter House and, again, Hodgson House won the girls and boys Standard's Cup respectively.

The School Athletics Meeting for girls and boys was held on the 10th and 12th December.

It was quite pleasing to see both girls and boys doing the western roll and straddle in the high jump, and showing good technique in the throwing events.

The School was honoured to have such distinguished spectators at the last day's meeting as Sir Richard Tumbull, Governor of Tanganyika, Lady Turnbull and the members of the Board of Trustees. Lady Tumbull very kindly presented the trophies. It was a happy occasion for Mr. Hodgson, the Chairman of the Board of Trustees, who saw the House which bears his name win three out of the four trophies.

Results of Sporting Events held this term:--

Inter House Relay Championship:

    Boys Girls
  1st
2nd
3rd
4th
Hodgson
Oram
Williams
Henderson
Carter
Palmer
Prichard
Henery

Inter House Athletics Standards Competition:

    Boys Girls
  1st
2nd
3rd
4th
Hodgson
Oram
Williams
Henderson
Carter
Palmer
Prichard
Henery

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Inter House Athletics Standards Championship:
    Boys Girls
  1st
2nd
3rd
4th
Hodgson
Williams
Oram
Henderson
Pritchard
Carter
Palmer
Henery

Inter House Cross Country Championship (Boys):
    Boys  
  1st
2nd
3rd
4th
Williams
Hodgson
Henderson
Oram
 

Individual Winner
  C. Bakewell,  House: Williams, Time: 17 mins. 48.6 sec.

CROSS COUNTRY POSITIONS

The School first twenty were:-- 1. C. Bakewell, 2. V. Poupoulas, 3. F. Galiussi, 4. D. Western, 5. D. Webster, 6. 0. Mareondonatos, 7. B. Firth, 8. D. Wilson, 9. J. Vielietti, 10. B. Dziura, 11. C. Delpeche, 12 S. Riddle, 13. M. Western, 14. S. Strong, 15. B. Zakian, 16. M. Main, 17. R. Franklin, 18. E. Hutehinson, 19. B. Nicholls, 20. N. Borrisow.


SCHOOL ATHLETICS MEETING--FINALS 12TH DEC.

The first annual sports were held on the 10th and 12th December, 1959. His Excellency, the Governor of Tanganyika, Sir Richard Turubull graced the occasion with Lady Turnbull who presented the prizes.

Fortunately the rain which had threatened to postpone the day's events held off for a few hours, long enough to dry the track sufficiently, but pre vious rain that morning had softened the track to such an extent that no outstanding times were recorded. The field events, however, were unaffected by the damp conditions. All thanks go to Mr. Brooker and his assistants for the smooth running of the meeting.

The highlights of the sports were the 100 yards and 220 yards senior girls and boys, which were extremely close in some eases. Diana Milner won both these events among the girls in grand style, while B. Zakian won both in the boys' races with comparative ease. V. Poupoulas and F. Galli ussi stayed together in the boy's senior mile and finished 1st and 2nd respecti vely. The boy's intermediate mile had a fast finish with M. Lehner gaining first place after a spurt in the last 50 yds. Vanessa Hocking won the girl's Intermediate 100 yds and 220 yds in two very close finishes. Sellick also clinched these two races for his House.

The Senior boy's hurdles was won by F. Vutirakis who gave a splendid exhibition of hurdling.

In the field events Kay Puttock distinguished herself as the girl's champion shot-putter while J. Gilmour won this event among the boys.

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The meeting closed with an attempt to beat the Tanganyikan 4 x 110 yds. relay (Men's) record. However the attempt failed by I see. owing to the unfavourable track conditions, and Gemmel, one of our fastest sprinters, was unable to run owing to illness.
On the presentation of the prizes, Hodgson House emerged triumphant claiming all three cups on the boy's side, the Standards Cup, Athletics, and Relay Cup's; Williams House won the Cross Country Trophy.
Among the girls Carter House won the Standard's and Relay Cups, and Priehard House won the Cup for the day's Athletics.
The final event was the presentation of the shield for the Inter-School
Sports held between the School, Malangali African Secondary School, and
Ifunda Trade School. The Shield was presented by Lady Turnbull to the
School Athletics Captain A. Sehneemann.

J. S.D.


ATHLETICS: STANDARDS ACHIEVED

Senior Girls:
Javelin
Discus
Shot
Long Jump
High Jump
80 yds. hurdles
100 yds.
220 yds.
Annelize van Buuren
Sally Morton
Kay Puttoek
Maroula Tofas
Susan Allanby
Gillian Ridley
Diana Milner
Diana Milner
Carter
Henery
Carter
Carter
Prichard
Prichard
Palmer
Palmer
66' 10 3/4"
60' 8 1/2"
24' 8 1/2"
13' 4 1/4"
4' 1"
14.9 sees.
12.9 sees.
31.2 sees
Intermediate Girls:
Discus
Long Jump
High Jump
100 yds.
80 yds. hurdles
220 yds.
Jacqueline Hudson
Anna Neekelmann
Barbara Lori
Vanessa Hocking
Evelyn Voigt
Vanessa Hocking
Prichard
Henery
Carter
Prichard
Carter
Prichard
67' 4"
12' 10"
4' 0"
13 sees.
14.4 sees.
30.3 sees.
Junior Girls:
80 yds.
150 yds.
Long Jump
High Jump
Javelin
Cricket Ball
70 yds. hurdles
Maeve Ferguson
Yvonne Fourie
Jeanette Barallon
Jeanette Barallon
Fiona Silcock
Dorothy Warwick
Pamela Rayment
Henery
Palmer
Prichard
Priehard
Carter
Palmer
Carter
11.2 sees.
21.4 sees.
12' 3 3/8"
4' 1"
53' 1"
132'
13.2 secs.
Senior Boys:
100 yds.

220 yds.
440 yds.
110 yds. hurdles
I mile
Long Jump
Pole Vault
Hammer
Discus
Shot
Javelin
High Jump
B. Zakian

B. Zakian
B. Zakian
Em. Vutirakis
V. Poupoulas
B. Springbett
J. Alevezos
R. Keller
M. Main
J. Gilmour
A. Schneemann
A. Schneemann
Hodgson

Hodgson
Hodgson
Hodgson
Oram
Henderson
Oram
Henderson
Oram
Henderson
Oram
Oram
10 secs.
Tanganyika record
23.2 sees.
56.6 sees.
16.5 sees.
5 min. 6.2 secs.
19' 2"
8' 9"
110' 10"
116'
38' I1"
134' 4"
5' 3"

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Hop, stcp and jump
880 yds.
Relay 4 x 110 yds.
B. Zakian
C. Bakewell
School team
Hodgson
Williams

39' 11"
2 mins 10.8 secs.
47.4 sees.
Intermediate Boys:
100 yds.
220 yds.
440 yds.
880 yds.
Pole Vault
Long Jump
High jump
Discus
Shot
Javelin
Hop, step and jump
100 yds. hurdles
1 mile
A. Sellick
A. Sellick
G. Afentakis
G. Cormack
E. van Buuren
A. Yjannikos
R. Maure
W. Meier
W. Palmarini
A. Marczewski
G. Afentakis
E. Kuilander
M. Lehner
Williams
Williams
Oram
Hodgson
Henderson
Williams
Williams
Hodgson
Williams
Williams
Oram
Williams
Williams
11.9 sees.
26.7 sees.
66.3 sees.
2 mins. 34.9 sees.
7'
15' 61"
4' 10"
93' 11 1/2"
33' 10 1/2"
105' 7"
31' 10"
18.3 sees.
6 min. 2.3 secs.

Junior Boys:

150 yds.
Long Jump
90 yds.
80 yds hurdles
Cricket ball
High Jump
H. Marmorat
D. Lyon
H. Marmorat
J. Baker
S. Watson
B. von Mutius
Hodgson
Hodgson
Hodgson
Williams
Oram
Hodgson
19.1 sec.
14' 4"
11.7 sees.
14.2 sees.
206'
4' 1"

CRICKET

In most British or Commonwealth secondary schools there is a strong cricket tradition, while many boys arrive from their preparatory and primary schools already steeped in the atmosphere of the game. Cricket was not, however, a major game at Kongwa and few boys came to St. Michael's and St. George's with any fundamental knowledge of how to play it. It was obvious that to foster cricket was going to be an uphill struggle. It was decided, as a first step, that cricket should be on a voluntary basis. This cut down the number of cricket ers in the school to something over one'hundred and fifty and meant that coaching and playing time would not be wasted on boys who had no interest in being taught.

The season opened with a week of nets, followed by a round of House matches. The quality of the cricket, taken generally, was neither better nor worse than had been expected. A few points, however, did emerge. There

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were after all, one or two natural cricketers in the School ; thc best players were not necessarily in the older age-groups. and the general approach to the game was at least a positive one.

After the first round of House matches, the boys were divided into groups according to their ability and coaching began in earnest. Unfortunately a great deal of time was lost in the second half of the term owing to the un- seasonal rain, but a gradual improvement in the standard of cricket was shown and it was remarkable to see how some boys, who had never held a bat in their lives before, responded to regular net practice. Most boys now know, in theory anyhow, that cricket is essential a `sideways' game and that they will never improve unless they can put the theory into practice.

Towards the end of November we were greatly indebted to Mr. John Springall, the M.C.C. coach and Nottinghamshire alt-rounder, who visited

the school for a week's coaching. His nets were as instructive as they were popular, and he particularly picked out Gilmour, Kuestermann, Barber, Barker, Meier, Maure, Baxter, the two Whitemans, Blackman and Bump- steed as being the most promising cricketers in the school.

1st XI

At the start of the season it looked as if the 1st Xl would be doomed to long hours in the field and considerably less time at the crease. The batting was weak, the bowling lacking in aggression, and the fielding suspect. The first match bore out this supposition. Playing against the Staff, the boys could only take 4 wickets at the cost of 145 runs, and were themselves dis missed for 93. In the next match, against the Railways, it was much the same story, the School being out for 60 and the Railways passing this total for the loss of two wickets.

After this very depressing start, however, the 1st XI began to do better. Against the Iringa Cricket Association the team lost by only 5 runs, while against Hagi's Xl the rain came down when the School was in a promising position. In the last match of the season the School defeated the Staff by 6 wickets. The Staff Xl was admittedly a somewhat depleted team, but the boys did well to win so comfortably and showed that they had developed finally into a useful side.

Gilmour made a sensible captain, besides being a watchful opening bat and a useful 'nediumsonpaced bowler. Kuestermann was technically the best bat in the side, but he did not come off in matches. As a bowler, however he was very much more dangerous than anyone else and took 20 wickets in four innings. He was also the best fielder in the side. Butler developed into an able, if untidy wicket-keeper. Springbett hit the ball hard, batting particularly well in the second match against the Staff, vvhen he scored 72, including four 6s and eight 4s. Mills made up in concentration what he lacked in style, and on two occasions saved the side from collapse. Warwick has shown signs of developing into a leg-break bowler. Pletts, Nicholls and CarlislesonKitz have batted well on occasion, while, among the younger members of the side, Barber, Barker and Meier should all be immensely useful in the future.

Colours were awarded to Gilmour and Kuestermann.

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Summary of 1st XI matches:

v. Staff: Staff 45 for 4 decl. (Lake 45 not out, Hall 43, Oram 27; Gilmour 3 for 38)
    School 93 (Nicholls 21 not out; Hart 4 for 23). Lost by 52 runs.

v. Railways: School 60 (Gilmour 23, Mills 22; Barker 5 for 25) Railways 61 for 2.
    Lost by 8 wickets.

v. Iringa Cricket Association:
    Iringa Cricket Association 84 (Johnson 26; Kuestermann S for 30)
    School: 79 (Mills 23; Palekar 8 for 21)
    Lost by S runs.

v. Hagi's XI:
    Hagi's XI 59 for 9 (Hagi 34; Kuestermann 7 for 17)
    Drawn--rain stopped play.

v. Aga Khan Club:
    School 73 for 9 (Meier 21; Khaki 5 for 9)
    Drawn--rain stopped play.

v. Staff:
    Staff 129 for 9 decl. (Hart 53 not out; Kuestermann 7 for 76)
    School 130 for 4 (Springbett 72)
    Won by 6 wickets.

Summary of 2nd XI matches:

v. Malangali School:
     School 77 (Nicholls 32)
     Malangali 31.
     Won by 46 runs.

Results of Senior House Matches:

 
1.
2.
3.
4
 
Henderson
Oram
Williams
Hodgson
 
.....
.....
.....
.....
Played
3
3
3
3
Won
2
1
1
2
Drawn
1
1
1
1
Lost
0
1
1
2
Points
14
8
8
2

Results of Junior House Matches:

1.
2.
3.
4
Oram
Henderson
Williams
Hodgson
.....
.....
.....
.....
5
5
5
5
2
2
1
0
3
2
3
2
0
1
1
3
18
16
12
4

Lastly, may I thank all those members of Staff who have given up so much of their time coaching and umpiring; Mr. van Blockland for putting down five very good concrete wickets according to a formula of his own ; Mr. Barker for making the cricket boxes and scoring-board; and Mr. Lake for repairing cricket bats.

M. de L. H.

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TENNIS

For the first time a full scale coaching programme was organised, and each game afternoon 72 girls were catered for on the six available courts.

It has been most gratifying to see the tremendous improvement in the standard of tennis played by the girls--especially during their free time.

We look forward to the next dry season when we hope to introduce competitive tennis amongst the Houses and local opposition.

Our thanks to Messrs. Brooks, Henderson and Lake for the coaching they have given.


ART CLUB

The highlight of the term was the showing of two films. The first dealt with the magnificent collection which is housed in the National Gallery of Art, Washington. It was particularly interesting as the second half of the film was in colour showing off to great advantage the glowing hues of the Impressionist and Post-Impressionist schools.

The second film was an unusual study of one of the most talked-about figures of modern American painting, Grandma Moses. The child-like simplicity of her technique gave us an insight into American country life of the last century, as welt as demonstrating to us so clearly why she is enjoying such fabulous success in America.

The Wednesday Art Club continues to flourish and the more promising pictures are now on display in the Art Room.

Lastly, may we thank Mr. Halls for showing the films.

J. A. J.


CHESS CLUB

The Club has acquired a number of books on chess in the course of the term and also some additional sets of chessmen. We are grateful to those who have helped us in this way.

Owing to the small numbers attending, our plans for a Chess Tourna ment remain in abeyance. We hope that the New Year will see a turn for the better in the fortunes of the Club, which so far has led a rather precarious existence.

H. B. W.


DRAMATIC SOCIETY

Attendance at meetings during the third term decreased rather dis appointingly, but this may be explained in that so many of the members were pre-occupied with preparations for the examinations. In spite of the lack of support, `Journey's )End' was read and acted very competently during two consecutive meetings. 'The Monkey's Paw', produced by Christopher Boyce, was very well acted and enjoyed by all who attended the performance.

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Unfortunately it failed to give thc full intended impact owing to the absence of lighting effects and to the fact that it was read. But it was an excellent effort and, we hope, a precedent for others to follow.

Owing to the generosity and help of the Dar es Salaam Players, who so kindly loaned us the `Little Theatre', we were able to perform 'Arms and the Man' in Dar es Salaam on the 18th and 19th December. In the first place the publicity appeared to be insufficient, which resulted in rather hurried improvisation of handbills for circulation and the despatching of the Chair man, wearing sandwich-boards, to Acacia Avenue! Ultimately the play was well-supported. We are satisfied that our undertaking was successful and that the great deal of hard work entailed in making its revival possible was well worth-while.

A special word of thanks is due to all members of the Society who accompanied the play to Dar es Salaam as stage hands and assistants. Under the supervision of Mr. Lake and Mr. Johnson, the set had to be adapted to a smaller stage and completely repainted, under very hot condi tions, in two days. However, dress rehearsal took place on schedule. The set was dismantled somewhat more quickly when someone undid the crucial clamp and the scenery collapsed upon the producer and a member of the Dar Players, amid almost general laughter. We are grateful to Miss Dickinson who supervised the wardrobe and to Mrs. Halls, and congratulate Mr. Brooks on his double success with this, our first Dramatic Society production.

In conclusion we thank Mr. H. K. Manji, who so generously arranged the transport to Dar of our heavy set, and all those parents and well-wishers- too numerous to name--who helped so much during our stay in the Capital.

Anna Boddy


LIBRARY

I think it can now be said that we have a library that is basically complete, with a reaonably accurate catalogue and an efficient, if unambitious, with drawals system--though the existence of the latter is still ignored by the more amnesic amongst us. We can never have the fine trimmings of the long established library, nor can we have complete efficiency. The nature of the voluntary and part-time work done in the library dictates that. This, however, cannot (and has not) stopped the library developing into an essential organ of school life.

In the past term, despite the preoccupation of many library functionaries with examinations, substantial development has taken place.

Several new magazines have been added to the already considerable selection displayed on the magazine rack. Numerous new books have appeared to fill the shelves. The library can now boast of a section dealing with the background to American life and history, thanks to the kind gift of the United States Information Service. The Chaplain has been parti cularly solicitous in obtaining books for the religious section. His efforts, the kind donations of members of his old Parish of Bromley (Kent) and all other donations received this term are acknowledged with thanks.

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There is still one problem, one which must face all school libraries, to be overcome. This is the tendency to treat magazines and books as mere conveniences, and not as useful, and often expensive items. Accordingly, general care of these is somewhat unsatisfactory. It is hoped that more considerate treatment of books and magazines will develop alongside the expansion of the library.

Lastly it remains for me to express my thanks to all those who have in any way contributed towards the smooth-running of the Library this term.

B. Butler,    
(Head Librarian)


THE MUSIC SOCIETY

Two meetings were held this term, and both were entirely devoted to musical films. They ranged from singing to playing the violin.

On Friday, 16th October, the first two films were shown. The first, "The Hawaii University Choir" was, as the title suggests, about a group of young students of many nationalities who sang delightfully during a concert tour of Japan. The next film for that meeting was about Joseha Heiftz, the great violinist. It showed glimpses of the artist's home life, his practice sessions, and the concert stage.

The second meeting, held on the 30th October, started with a film "Black Swan". This was a ballet film featuring one of the greatest American ballerinas, Miss Maria Tallchief, who is an American Indian.

Finally we saw "Dance to Freedom" which was the story of the escape to the West, through Berlin from Hungary, of two top-ranking Hungarian ballet dancers--Nora Kovach and Istavan Rabovsky. The film included many sequences of superb ballet by the husband and wife team. There were some very amusing parts to the story, as well as a certain amount of sus pense.

The members of the music society look forward to more meetings with Mr. Charles next term. We thank him for arranging for the films to be sent here from U.S.I.S., in Nairobi.

B. Hawkins.

NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY

this term has fairly seethed with activity, the rainy season having started in full swing half-way through the term.

normal routine is an outing on wednesday and a talk on fridays.

during these outings we indentified many of the trees of the area with the key books. a special activity was to mark out a rectangle, eighty yards by one hundred yards, and study it. on successive wednesdays we mapped out and identified the trees, shrubs etc.

and noticed what kinds of animal life there were in the area.

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a few weeks before half term mr. booth and two members of the society,

p. morant and s. cormack, went on a 'recce' trip beyond mba to the game department's temporary bridge over the great ruaha to investigate the possibility of a full scale trip to the reserve on the other side of the river.

on the monday of half-term a group of eight, with mr. booth and mr. hall, went to mba ona daytrip in the school bus. the object of the tripwas to try to find the local herd of elephant. we saw signs of the herd's progress and we were told where it had been by two africans. we also saw a kudu and a herd of impala and a number of interesting birds. the acacias of this area are of interest.

after the examinations at half-term a select seven, with mr. & mrs. booth and mr. hall, crammed into the school bus amid tons of food and two twenty-gallon milk churns full of water and set out for mikumi game reserve. a separate account of this has been written.

with the beginning of the rains moths and butterflies began to appear and many members of the society have begun to build up a school collection. the interesting point here is that as the days go by the species of moths and butterflies on wing are constantly changing. there is a tendency for more moths to be caught than set and mounted and only the best speci mens are being used. killing methods have varied but cyanide bottles have proved the most effective. large moths are now killed by injecting oxalic acid.

dr. hodges became our first visiting speaker when he talked to the society about buttterfiies and their mimicry and showed us some of the boxes of his fine collection of butterflies. this was a great success and we look forward to another visit from him.

a few weeks ago two members of the society, p. morant and j. pater son, went out with mr. booth to collect butterflies and see what game there was. they found a fresh-water crab in the little ruaha and brought back a number of butterflies.

thus ends another term and the first year of the natural history society. this has been the most active term of the year and it hoped that next term will be just as full.

s. frearson.


natural history and geographical outing to the mikumi game reserve

on november 14th the following visited the mikumi game-controlled area: mr. & mrs. booth, mr. hall, c. pany, g. cormack, s. frearson, p. morant, m. kelly, mw and r. clowes.

we left school at about 11.30 a.m. in the school bus and after a very hot journey of about 140 miles we arrived at the mikumi rest house. here we unpacked the bus and got things organised. at about s p.m. we left the rest house and went to a water-hole not far away and found that the elephants that usually drank there were not using it. at the water-hole however, we saw vultures and glossy ibis.

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we then took the bus on the road behind the rest house and then walked up a valley in the dusk where we saw roebuck and zebra. it was dark when we returned. we made tea and had an excellent supper. we then settled down for the night, a number of the party sleeping in the open. the morning tea-makers rose rather too early and were eventually persuaded back to bed. they finally produced a fine cup of tea at 5 a.m.

at about 5.45 a.m. we set off along the main road where we saw wilde beest and buffalo, one a large bull, impala, zebra, hartebeeste and one jackal. we turned off on to the railway road to kilosa at mikumi. the scenery immediately changed and became greener with baobabs scattered about. this was typical giraffe country and we saw a number of them as well as zebra, wildebeest, monkeys, and also a herd of ten or eleven hartebeest with their foals. we also saw warthogs and it was interesting to see that all these had young which were obviously only about a week old. we followed this road for about 12 miles stopping occasionally and taking a look round. on the way back we stopped and walked off into the bush. we saw a duiker sleeping in a gully, impala, wildebeest and had a glimpse of buffalo. when we arrived back at the bus one scout was missing. while waiting for him we attempted to identify some ofthe trees in this rather parkland-like country. we decided that the scout must have been waiting for us down the road and sure enough we found him about a quarter of a mile away. he said he had been trying to track us. on the way back we came upon a rhino not more than fifty yards away. we stopped with the engine still ticking over. the animal turned away and ran parallel to the road and as we drove on, we had a fineview of it. it started to take more interest in the bus sowe left.

we arrived back at the rest house at about 11.30 a.m. after seeing some more game of the types already mentioned. we had a large meal after which we washed our plates and cutlery and packed up our beds and personal belongings, ready for departure.

one scout was feeling off-colour, so the other one came with us. we went up the road behind the rest house and stopped at the same place as we did on the previous evening.

now, instead of going between the two hills, we climbed one and went along the ridge and from here we had a good view of the surrounding country side and the game in it. we arrived back at camp and had a good wash as most members of the party were fairly grimy.

on our way back, in the ruaha gorge, we saw 2 elephants in the water. we descended the slope but the elephants had crossed from the middle of the river to the far bank. we walked out on to the stones into the river and tried to see the animals a bit more clearly in the rather thick bush on the river bank. eventually they turned off fairly fast and gave the impression they might cross back again to our side. this caused some consternation and caused two of the party to fall into the river. we returned to school very tired and happy, and all had supper at mr. booth's house.

we would like to thank the game department for allowing us to use the rest house and for supplying extra beds and also mr. & mrs. booth and mr. hall for conducting the trip. we would also like to thank the caterer for supplying us with so much food.

m. clowes.

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5th iringa guide company

at the beginning of this term, as several members had left, the company was split into three large patrols. mrs. moss, our lieutenant, also left; remembering her invaluable help and advice we were sorry to see her go.

during the term the guides have participated in many enjoyable acti vities. we began our first meeting by hiking some distance from the school, stopping near some trees and rocks where we cooked sausages on sticks and toasted bread over a fire.

some weeks later the guides of both companies were privileged to have a visit from miss matthew, the guide trainer for tanganyika, who taught us various team games and camp-fire songs.

a widespread game which was the combination of a scavenger hunt and a stalking expedition was organised by miss carter and enjoyed by all.

during the term, meetings have included test instruction, stalking and tracking expeditions, nature study, charades, team games and first-aid.

finally i wish to thank miss carter who, although working single handed, has so ably and efficiently organised the meetings throughout the term.

susan croft,   
company leader.


6th iringa scout troop

this term has been comparatively uneventful. the afternoons have been passed learning and passing tests and concluded by a variety of games. on friday nights there has been 2nd class and first class training alter nately. the term's high lights were the scout camp held on the banks of the little ruaha, and the night game held on friday night, with great success. attempts to obtain a scout hut have as yet been unsuccessful. a number of tenderfoot and second class badges have been awarded as shown below.

  eagles
elephants
lions
otters
total
2 tenderfoot
1 tenderfoot
3 tenderfoot
1 tenderfoot
4 tenderfoot
1 second class

2 second class
1 second class
4 second class

peter lovell,   
(p. l. eagles.)

stamp club

the club now receives gibbons' stamp monthly regularly from the u.k. and has also been presented with a copy of gibbons' stamp catalogue. as a result of researches in this volume a number of members were gratified to find that they had some quite valuable stamps in their collections.

we are grateful to all those who continue to help the club by sending along stamps of special note, and especially to mr. lake who presented the club with a series of articles of topical interest which members found of great value.

h. b. w.

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fete

from what i saw of the fete and what i heard, it went--almost literally- with a swing. many local people and many from all over tanganyika attend ed, mostly parents, of course, who came up to see their children.

i spent the time supervising stalls. at first i was at the '`broken crockery". this was there for the sole purpose of breaking things. it was, literally, smashing fun! i remember we started that stall with no money at all and there were no prizes but we made about three pounds on it, mainly from junior boys!

i left after the first half-hour and was wandering around when i was pounced upon and dragged to the "trick-cycling" stall. i was installed at the cashier's desk with the money and an impatient queue to attend to. there i stayed for the rest of the day.

the trick-cycling was a wonderful idea. the course was a long, winding path with bottles at the sides and in the wide, middle spaces, and boxes at the corners. it was situated on the embankment and there was a ladies' and a men's track, since in parts the bank was too steep for girls.

once we got going we had many customers, european and african alike, and to our delight some members of staff tried also. whether people were taking part or watching we never lacked a crowd, more especially towards the end of the afternoon, when most of the other stalls had closed down and the hall was empty. we were the last to close, having made three pounds.

there were two coconut shies and there were crowds at both; once again the majority were boys though some girls did try. they must have made quite a good profit.

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I know that M. Main at the darts' stall made approximately nine pounds. Apparently he never stopped talking and so attracted quite an audience and many customers.

Between intervals the police band, led by Mr. Webster, was playing. The tunes were many and varied and they played beautifully.

In the Hall were the clothes' stalls, confectionery stalls, library stall, flower stalls, fruit stalls, bottle stall, raffle stall and the food stalls where preserves were sold. The climax of the day came when the raffle-tickets were drawn in the Hall. Mr. Beesley announced and Mrs. Francis drew the tickets. There were very worth-while prizes, such as a crate of beer, a whisky bottle, a Christmas cake, a food hamper and others. I think people went away well-pleased.

For our first attempt at a fete it was a great success. When shall we have the next?

Daniela Tognetti, IVA.

OUTWARD BOUND SCHOOL, LOITOKITOK

We made our own way to Moshi where we were picked up by a truck which took us round the mountain to Loitokitok, seventy miles from Moshi. The School itself is situated at 5,000 ft on the lower edge of the forest. Only nine of the twenty three days spent at Loitokitok were actually spent in the School; the rest passed in various camping sites on the mountain.

School life began at 6.30 a.m. A great deal of time was spent on the ropes' course, on the theory of mountaineering, learning about first aid and doing initiative tests. In the evenings we usually had a lecture by one of the instructors or a short film on the Outward Bound Schools in the United Kingdom.

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Kibo Crater from Kaiser Wilhelm Spitz

During the time spent on the mountain we did several aeclimatising walks with a great deal of rock climbing and *abseiling; each person did one solo-night during which he had to build a bivouac and cook two meals- supper and breakfast--for which purpose he was supplied with two matches.

The actual ascent, which took four days, was made during the last week of the course. Setting off from Kibo hut (15,300 ft.) at 2 o'clock in the morning, we began the long climb up the scree. At about 6.30 a.m. the stin rose and made a beautiful picture as it silhouetted Mawenzi at the East and bathed us in warmth for which we were very thankful, for up to that time it had been bitterly cold. The first rays of sun were already reflected by the ice and we were obliged to wear our snow-goggles.

At about 7 o'clock the main body of the party had reached Gillman's Point which is about one hotir's walk from Kaiser Wilhelm Spitz and 600 feet below it. After that it was every man for himself, although the strongest did help the weakest and eventually every member of the course had complet ed the tiring journey to the top of Africa.

P. Marmorat, VA.

*roped descent of a steep rock face.


THE POPPLE WHO HAD NO TOES

The Popple whose fate I now relate,
Was the popple who had no toes-
But how this tragedy came to be,
Nobody knows for sure but me. There lived in the heart of the African Sea,
A popple, his aunt and his uncles three.
One day the popple thought he'd try,
To cross the ocean by and by.

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So o he set in great glad glee,
To swim across the African Sea.
But this little popple was not vcry wise,
For even though he had good eyes,
He swam too close to a cavern deep,
In which a mammal lay aleep.

He whisked his tail and blew his nose,
And then off came the popple's toes.
So there you are, now you know,
How the popple came to lose his toe.

Pamela Roe, 1A

WHAT THE MOON TOLD ME

I couldn't get to sleep last night, however hard I tried. Counting sheep wouldn't do nothing would. So I got out of bed and sat on the window-sill; I looked up into the clear starry sky and said to myself, '`I wonder where the moon is to night !" Then suddenly I heard a high, tinkly noise, and looking up I s w t pale, roun d, silvery ball; then it came nearer and nearer, a little dooi popped open. and out came a tiny creature who said, in a high-pitched v ote' I am the man in the moon; did you send for me?'' I was very surprised at this, and could only stammer as best I could, "Y-Yes!"

of.

Then came a long string of words that I couldn't make head or tail

But, eventually, he calmed down and said, ``I'll tell you your fortune for the comine week --tomorrow you'll have bacon, egg ttnd roll for break fast, ttnd you'll get full marks for Latin, and come top of the class in English A great surprise awaits you at the fete on Saturday, ttnd you might go out for the week-end.

"On Tuesday you'll be summoned to Mrs. Palmer for a lecture on inky fingers, ttnd you will be given a hundred lines by a prefect for being noisy!''

Then, all of sudden, the whiohe sky seemed to be going round and round; the house rose from its very found it toils and began to turn cart wheels in the air. Then I lost my balance and hell off the window-sill and down, down, down into the starry sky, tiud I saw the queer little man return into the silvery moon and vanish into sp ace Then I wtis conscious of a sudden softness, and opening my eyes I found I was in my ovvn bed at home, and the sun wtis streaming through the vvindcvv

Whether this was ti dream or not remains to be seen!

Christine Wiggins, lB.

SAFARI TO TIlE BIG CITY.

Last August our fttmily of four vvent on a `stifari' to Johannesburg in our Volkswagen Microbus. In the back of the cttr vve set up a temporary kitchen, consisting of a two-ringed oilstove and many tins of food. At

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night we put our three boxes of kit on the floor of the car and put a dunlo pillo mattress on top of them, this, together with sheets, blankets and pillows, made an extremely comfortable bed for us.

For the first 1,200 miles, through Tanganyika (we started from Mwadui) and part of Rhodesia, we saw very, very little but bush, bush, and bush. By the time we reached civilisation we were in Rhodesia and heading for the Victoria Falls. We stayed at the Falls for two and a half days in a small but very comfortable three-roomed bungalow. During those two days we went for a river trip up the Zambesi and saw about ten hippos and many crocodiles.

After the Victoria Falls we drove to Wankie, and through 200 miles of the Game Reserve there. The Reserve covers an area of 2,500 sq. miles, and is absolutely untouched by man except for a rest camp at both main gates of the Reserve (we stayed in one of the camps that night). We drove through the Reserve in a day, and we saw at least one of every species of animal in that area. In one place we saw aherd of about two hundred buffalo. They were quite near to us, bat there happened to be a river between the huge beasts and ourselves, luckily.

About five days later we arrived at our destination, Johannesburg. After an hour or so's searching, and aided by a map of the city, we eventually arrived at the house of some friends, who live in one of the many suburbs. We stayed in Jo'burg four days. During the first two days we went shopping in the "O.K. Bazaars". This huge shop caters for everything, and as we had not seen such a large shop or such low prices for such a long time vve ended up by having to buy two suitcases to carry all our purchases.

After spending a wonderful four days in Jo'Burg we struck off right and drove across Portuguese East Africa. Before entering P.E.A. we purchased, with some difficulty, some Portuguese currency -- "escudos". When we proudly presented them at a petrol station, the natives looked at us as though we were absolutely mad and handed us change in Rhodesian currency!

After P.E.A. we went on through Nyasaland and made a 100 mile detour to see Lake Nyasa. About 8 miles from the lake we saw the following notice: "22 hairpin bends in the next 7 miles". Furthermore, the road drops about 3,000 ft. in those same terrible 7 miles. After the first awful bend our nerves were all on edge. At the second bend my seven-year old sister shouted with eager excitement, "O look Daddy, there's a car over the edge!" We all paled. Eventually we arrived in one piece at the beautiful Lake Nyasa, and drove alongside it for about ten miles.

We then returned along the same route as we had come, via Mbeya, Tabora and, lastly, Mwadui.

It was a wonderful holiday and one which I'm sure none of us will ever forget.

Jane Furbank IIIA.

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THE RAT-HUNT

The air was still, not a stir anywhere. A lone chirrup broke the silence from outside, and a shuffling and ruffle of clothes inside. A feeling of un-easiness was in everyone's heart.

This timc was the quietest hour of the day in the dormitory, but on that particular night there was something eerie about the silence. Boys lay on their beds, waving their feet in the air and reading books of the widest variety. No one cared about anything and no one was going to step out of the way to care about anyone else.

A piercing scream rang through the dormitory.

"A rat!" someone yelled wildly.

A rolling of thunder, which was the rumble of naked feet on the polished floor, converged on the spot of distress.

"Where?" someone asked blankly.

"He was on my wrist a moment ago!"

"Where's he now?" asked the former consistently.

"Dunno".

A general whisper of disappointment drifted through the throng.

Then another cry.

"There he is!" a voice yelled.

Field pieces such as hockey sticks and the like were produced from every crevice of lockers. These were raised and brandished wildly until someone had the chance of a good shot and swiped. The hockey stick whizzed through the air and crashed towards the victim.

A shout of glee and victory!

"Got him!"

""Bosh, that's one of my socks!" disapproved another.

A mad rush as the boys surged forward, and a series of crashes and cries illustrating the wild lust to kill echoed through the dorm. This was followed by a hearty bellow of victory and the victim was raised above the bobbing heads by its tail, after having been squashed mercilessly against a corner of the room. A murmur of approval rose from the crowd.

The bloodthirsty killer grasped the rat in a now bloody hand and, waving it wildly, lie toured the House, at the head of a band of fellow- hunters. The uproar almost raised the roof and when the victor thought that he had completed his tour of triumph he despatched the stinking car cass and returned once more to his favourite Agatha Christie. The crowd, havine lost their leader, dispersed, approaching their beds with melancholy after such an occasion. But now they chatted unceasingly about their exploits therein.

B. Di Zitti, IVA.

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THE TREASURES OF MY COUNTRY

The treasures of my country Lebanon--lie mainly in its famous cedar forests, and its ancient temples, existing today btit as ruins. They are the centre of attraction just as the Colosseum in Italy, the Houses of Parliament in England or the Statue of Liberty in New York.

High on the snow-capped mountains, facing the still waters of the Mediterranean, exist these famous cedar forests. But the reckless cutting in the early days to build ships, and the ravages of the goat have greatly reduced them. However, others have been planted.

In winter, this place becomes a week-end resort where everyone enjoys the pleasures )whiell winter offers. The miles of accumulated ice make it an excellent place for ski-ing. The scent of the aged trees is incomparable, and the distant echoes resemble the chime of bells at Christmas, and the chorus of angelic voices.

The western side drops in a series of terraces. broken by magnificent gorges, down to the blue of the Mediterranean. A great confusion of colour reigns over everything, and the perspective of trees attracts the artist.

Then, far away in the distance, stand those ruins, the ruins that were once mighty and precious to the generations that used to be. This is a magnificent sight to us, who live in this generation, for it shows us the skill ed work and careful designing of those days. All that is left today are those strong and proud pillars, which dominate the sky. This famous place is known as `Balbek', often described as the place of the Gods and Goddesses.

The country is famous for its olive trees and mulberries, and rich with its own silk industry. There are several colleges and two famous universities, one French and the other American. Besides this, there are the summer sports--for example, horse riding and watter ski-ing -- and a wide range of entertainments for day or night Although Lebanon may he described as just a small piece of land on the western shores of the Mediterranean, it has its own treasures to be proud of, as any other cotintry in this world.

L. Mukabaa, VA.

IMPRESSIONS

low powerfully are our impressions of places influenced by the circumstances in which we find ourselves at the time.

I shall always remember my first return to England after three years in Tanganyika. I was escaping from the school I had been attending out here and I viewed my native-land with the ardour of an exile returning home from the land of bondage. As the plane glided lower and lower over the vivid green landscape, with which I so unfavourably compared the brownness I had left behind, my heart swelled with love. We came to a

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gentle halt on the runway and I could not escape from the plane fast enough. Miraculously, the day was cloudless and I gazed approvingly at the gentle blue above (so different from the hard, glaring sky at that other, semi-arid place) and took great gulps of the cool, tangy air with a hint of frost -- "Like champagne!" I thought ecstatically. Everything was marvellous.

Three years later I was again returning to England. This time I was returning to my boarding school there, after a holiday in Tanganyika. The landing was terrible. I could not see a thing when I looked down be cause of the dense grey clouds. After an eternity the plane shuddered to a standstill. I felt violently sick and I had earache. Burdened with my luggage I dragged myself out i)nto the cold, clammy air. Was this only September'? Yet my teeth were chattering. A thin, depressing drizzle wrapped everything in a grey mist. Oh, for the glorious sunshine I'd just left.

Wistfully I recalled my first impressions as I had landed at Entebbe a few months before. The night had been warm and musky and the air filled with the mystic night-sounds of Africa. With the strange whine of crickets in my ears I had rejoiced in the splendour about me as I looked at the velvet sky sprinkled with a myriad brilliant jewels.

Kay Puttoek, VI Arts.

This palatial place of concrete, glass and brick

Sprawls across the bottom of a saucer- The sides rise to ugly rock-strewn hills

Beyond which--so we understand--lies Africa.

The rains are due. The air lies heavily.

Upon the hills a nap of green begins to spread

And soften the parched harshness of the ground.

The playing fields lie hard and cracked,

Awaiting the violent blessing of the rain.

Behind the glass and brick a noise of babel Rises to surprise the prowling hawk, And startles the serenity of the sky.

VI ARTS.

UNDER T THE OF EXAMINATION

Aurora Borealis is an instrument used for getting cows into a corral.

The Romans won the battle because their amour was better.

My friend lives in Dar es Salaam and is, therefore, more civilised than I am.

Mirage is when a man and woman settle down fqr life.

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SALVETE

I
B
David Allen Marilyn Barton
Gerard Ambrose Ann Beaumont
Jacqueline Ambrose Cesare Biasci
Sally Aspinwall John Bird
David Bannister Victor Boddy
Sally Barker Alison Braithwaite
Stephanie Brend Valerie Leys
Robert Brusse John McDonough
Victoria Burnett Deirdre Maloney
Jacqueline Burns Ian Marshall
Richard Bursztyn Pauline Marshall
Diana Callear Brian Megson
Robert Clay Ian Mountain
Linda Cook Susan Nichols
Anthony Cox Jill O'Brien
Pauline Crole-Rees Rodney Patrick
Alastair Currie Hilary Pell
Gillian Dawson Roger Phillips
Roger Down Robert Punter
Dennis Drummond June Richards
Patricia Fckhart Rosemary Robinson
John Ghaui Brenda Rolo
Peter Glynn Richard Sloan
Lucy Grandeourt David Spours
Ian Hallowes Flias Spyron
Simon Hamersley Jean Spratt
Karen Harding Alan Stone
Lindsey Hawkins Lesley Stones
Michael Hilditch Linda Sweet
Daphne Holmes Frank Tanner
Barbara Horley Rieneke van der Hek
Barbara Howe Timothy Vincent
Neonain Johnston Sara Walker
Fira Jones Susan White
Geoffrey Jones Lyn Williams
Kirsten Jorgensen Diana Woodward
Jerzy Krotiuk Thomas Yarwood.

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VALETE

Form House
Mary Adendorff 2-A
John Alevezos 4-C
Hilary Barber ..... ..... SB
Anna Boddy ..... 6 Science
Anna Maria Bonini ..... 5A
Elizabeth Browning
Hazel Carroll
Maeve Ferguson
Brian Firth .....
Franco Galliussi .....
John Gilmour .....
Brian Goby .....
Charles Hallowes
Anne Hargrave .....
Anna Howell .....
Jon Howell .....
Roland Keller .....
Susan Kerr .....
Jane Kingdon .....
4B
2B
2B
5A
SB
...... 6 Science
..... 4C
3B
..... 4B SB
.... 6 Science
Henery
Oram
Prichard
Carter Vice-Captain of School, House
Captain, School Prefect, Secre
tary-Dramatic Society
Henery Prefect of Dining Hall, House
Captain, School Prefect
Henery
Henery
Henery
Williams
Oram
House Prefect, Rugby 1st XV House Prefect, Rugby 1st XV, School Athletics
Henderson House Prefect, Rugby 1st XV
Henderson
Hodgson
Hencry
Henery House Prefect
Returning to U.K.
Pharmacy in U.K.
Secretarial Course.
Secretarial Course, U.K.
Leaving Tanganyika
Leaving Tanganyika.
Commerce in U.K.
Engineering in U.K.
Joining British Army in U.K.
Michaefhouse School, Natal.
Secretarial Course in U.K.
Williams House Prefect, Stage Manage
ment Electronic Engineering in U.K.
4 C Henderson House Prefect, 1st Rugby XV Railways Training School, Nbi.
5 B Palmer Captain of School, School Pre
fect. Secretarial Course U.K.
6 Arts Prichard School Prefect, Head of House Nursing in U.K.

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Ludwig Kobak 4C Hodgson
George Kosmetos 4C Oram
Tony Marchant SB Henderson Joining R.A.F. in U.K.
Phillippe Marmorat 5A H odgson
Garth Middlemass Transferred to Kenya.
Diana Milner SB Palmer House Prefect
Sally Morton 5A Henery House Prefect Secretarial Course, U.K.
John Naya 4C Hodgson
Adie Schneemann SB Oram House Prefect, Rugby 1st XV
School Athletics Joining R.A.F. in U.K.
Yvonne Sangster 3C
Carole Shenton SB
Carola Sorensen 5A
Brian Springbett 6 Science
Maroula Tofas 4B
Annelize van Buuren
Christine Viglietti. SB
1D
Lorraine Wicht 2B

Henery

Prichard House Prefect

Prichard House Prefect
Henderson Head of School, School Prefect
Head of House, Captain of
School Rugby and Hockey
Hockey 1st XI
House Prefect, Hockey 1st XI School in Switzerland.

Carter

Carter

Carter

Prichard

Civil Engineering in U.K.
Roadean School, South Africa.

Prichard

Civil Engineering in U.K.
Roadean School, South Africa.

EDITORIAL COMMITTEE

D. I. Brooks, Esq.
Kay Puttock, VI Arts
J. S. Dicks, Vi Arts.
The drawings are by Anna Bonini and Carola Sorensen.

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PRINTED BY

TANGANYIKA STANDARD

DAR ES SALAAM

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